Crispy Homemade Jalebi

Thin & Crispy Homemade Jalebi made the traditional way. These will stay crispy for hours and are best enjoyed with rabri or milk!

homemade jalebi

Some sweets bring back so many memories. Jalebi is really right up there as far as my food memories are concerned. When I was little, our everyday Sunday breakfast was fixed – jalebi with milk or rabri. My dad loves thin and crispy jalebi and there was this little sweet shop in the little town that we lived then and every Sunday dad would go there at 8 am in the morning and bring back hot and delicious jalebis for all of us. Those were the best jalebis I have ever had.

Jalebi still remains a very popular breakfast dish in North India. It’s funny because jalebi is a sweet but people so often eat it as a special breakfast on weekends or on festivals. I mean of course it’s a sweet so it’s eaten as a dessert but a lot of time people also relish it for breakfast. Also jalebi reminds of this advertisement which used to air back in the 90s in India (and I am sure every kid of that era must have seen this advertisement for a vegetable oil company) where a little kids gets angry with his parents and leaves the house but he returns back once his grandfather mentions that his mom made jalebi for breakfast! See the effect of homemade jalebi! It’s an adorable ad by the way!

homemade jalebi

With Diwali being just few days away, I wanted to share traditional homemade jalebi recipe with you guys. This recipe makes thin and crispy jalebis, just the way my dad likes it (and me too!). Jalebi can be made in a number of ways, the instant version is quite popular in which there’s no fermentation required. But if you ask me, there’s nothing like jalebi made the traditional way. The fermentation gives jablebis that little sourness, which is so characteristic of this Indian sweet. I have made instant jalebis before and the traditional ones are my clear favorite!

Jalebi is a spiral shaped traditional Indian sweet made with flour basically mixed with little chickpea flour and yogurt (even though adding yogurt is not absolutely essential). The batter is fermented and then deep fried and dipped in sugar syrup. People often get confused between two Indian sweets – jalebi and imarti. They look somewhat similar but in reality quite different. Imarti is made from lentils and is less common of the two. Jalebi is like everywhere! Like I said before, this recipe makes thin and crispy jalebis since that is what I love. For thicker jalebi, use a wider tip – I just used a squeeze bottle with a small tip.

homemade jalebi

So to make homemade jalebi here’s what you need to keep in mind.

1. Consistency of the batter: It should be flowing consistency but not super thin or thick. If the batter is dispersing in the oil as you pipe it, maybe it’s too thin and you need to add some flour to it. If you are not able to pipe it, add little water but always remember to add 1/2-1 teaspoon at a time and then check and see if you have achieved the desired consistency.

2. Temperature of the oil: when you pipe the jalebi batter, make sure the oil is at low heat. Too high and batter will be all over in oil as you try to make the jalebi shape. So keep temperature low when you pipe the batter in hot oil. Increase the heat once piped and then fry till crisp.

Jalebi is often enjoyed with rabri (which is thickened milk) and the combination is simply amazing! It also tastes great with milk. Hot homemade jalebi with milk for breakfast, yes give me! Hope you guys enjoy this special treat! These jalebis would stay crispy for hours, so you can easily make them in advance.

 

Method

In a large bowl mix together flour (maida), chickpea flour (besan), baking powder and baking soda.

Add yogurt, cardamom powder and mix

Add food color (if using) and water to form a flowing consistency batter.

jalebi-recipe-step-1

The batter should not be too thick or thin. You may need up to 3/4 water depending on quality of maida and besan.

Cover the batter and let the batter sit for 10-12 hours to ferment. Mine took 24 hours because I live in a cold place. You see small bubbles on top of the batter once it has fermented.

In morning, whisk the batter a little. You may need to add little water [around 1 tablespoon] if batter looks too thick at this point.

jalebi-recipe-step-2

Meanwhile add sugar to a pan.

Add water and mix with sugar and let it all come to a boil. Once it comes to a boil, add cardamom powder, saffron strand and lemon juice.

Let it simmer till syrup becomes sticky and form a one string consistency (see picture below – basically place a drop of syrup in between your thumb and index finger and then when you move fingers away from each other, it should form a single thread). If you can’t get consistency, just make it sticky. Keep the syrup warm while you make the jalebis.

jalebi-recipe-step-3

Transfer jalebi batter into a squeeze bottle. The one I used had a very small tip hence the thin jalebis. Meanwhile heat oil or ghee in a pan or kadai. I used a combination of the two. Keep heat to medium-low.

Squeeze batter in hot oil, making spiral motion from inside to outside. Remember to keep at low heat else you won’t be able to form the shape. If the batter is dispersing in the oil, maybe it’s too thin and you need to add some flour to it. Once you have made the spiral shape with the batter, increase the heat to medium-high.

Fry till crisp from both sides. Remove from oil and immediately dip in warm sugar syrup, few seconds on each side is good enough.

jalebi-recipe-step-4

Remove jalebis from the sugar syrup and transfer to a serving plate. Enjoy homemade jalebi with milk or rabri. You may garnish with some nuts on top!

homemade-jalebi-recipe

* The prep time includes the fermentation time of at least 12 hours or more depending on how cold it is where you live. Like I mentioned before, I kept my batter for fermentation for 24 hours.

Crispy Homemade Jalebi

Crispy Homemade Jalebi - Traditional spiral shaped Indian sweet made with flour and dipped in sugar syrup for a special treat!
homemade jalebi
Prep Time: 15 hours
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 15 hours 25 minutes
Servings: 4
Calories: 324 kcal
Author: Manali
5 from 2 votes
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Ingredients

jalebi

  • 1 cup all purpose flour, also known as maida
  • 1 tablespoon chickpea flour, also known as besan
  • 1/4 teaspoon cardamom powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • pinch of baking soda
  • 3 tablespoons yogurt
  • orange food color, optional
  • water, as needed - around 1/2 cup + 2-3 tablespoons
  • oil or ghee, to fry jalebi

sugar syrup

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/4 teaspoon cardamom powder
  • few saffron strands
  • 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl mix together flour (maida), chickpea flour (besan), baking powder and baking soda.
  2. Add yogurt, cardamom powder and mix
  3. Add food color (if using) and water to form a flowing consistency batter.
  4. The batter should not be too thick or thin. You may need up to 3/4 water depending on quality of maida and besan.
  5. Cover the batter and let the batter sit for 10-12 hours to ferment. Mine took 24 hours because I live in a cold place. You see small bubbles on top of the batter once it has fermented.
  6. In morning, whisk the batter a little. You may need to add little water [around 1 tablespoon] if batter looks too thick at this point.
  7. Meanwhile add sugar to a pan. Add water and mix with sugar and let it all come to a boil.
  8. Once it comes to a boil, add cardamom powder, saffron strand and lemon juice.
  9. Let it simmer till syrup becomes sticky and form a one string consistency. Basically place a drop of syrup in between your thumb and index finger and then when you move fingers away from each other, it should form a single thread.
  10. If you can't get consistency, just make it sticky. Keep the syrup warm while you make the jalebis.
  11. Transfer jalebi batter into a squeeze bottle. The one I used had a very small tip hence the thin jalebis.
  12. Meanwhile heat oil or ghee in a pan or kadai. I used a combination of the two. Keep heat to medium-low.
  13. Squeeze batter in hot oil, making spiral motion from inside to outside. Remember to keep at low heat else you won't be able to form the shape. If the batter is dispersing in the oil, maybe it's too thin and you need to add some flour to it. Once you have made the spiral shape with the batter, increase the heat to medium-high.
  14. Fry till crisp from both sides. Remove from oil and immediately dip in warm sugar syrup, few seconds on each side is good enough.
  15. Remove jalebis from the sugar syrup and transfer to a serving plate. Enjoy homemade jalebi with milk or rabri. You may garnish with some nuts on top!
Nutrition Facts
Crispy Homemade Jalebi
Amount Per Serving
Calories 324
% Daily Value*
Cholesterol 1mg0%
Sodium 11mg0%
Potassium 97mg3%
Carbohydrates 75g25%
Fiber 1g4%
Sugar 50g56%
Protein 4g8%
Vitamin A 15IU0%
Vitamin C 0.2mg0%
Calcium 34mg3%
Iron 1.5mg8%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Homemade Jalebi

homemade-jalebi-collage

43 thoughts on “Crispy Homemade Jalebi

        1. Honestly Jill, I have never done that so tough to answer. Also the way jalebis are made at sweet shops in India, they are always fried and dipped in the sugar syrup immediately. If you don’t care about the crispiness, you might want to try another Indian sweet Imarti [https://www.cookwithmanali.com/imarti/] .It’s very similar to jalebi but not crispy as such. Also not everyone likes crisp jalebis, some prefer the softer ones so there’s no hard and fast rule that jalebi has to be crispy. I personally like crispy jalebi and hence posted the recipe. Hope that helps! Btw I made these jalebi in the morning and they were crispy till evening so you can do that, make in the morning, they should be okay!

  1. Jalebis look great, Manali. Approximately how many jalebis can I expect using this recipe and ingredient portions? Thanks for sharing. I’m going to try them out this evening.

  2. Somebody already mentioned the movie Lion – but I just watched it and became curious about jalebi, and that’s how I found your page. Later I had a chance to try jalebi sold at grocery store here in SF but obviously it wasn’t fresh – but now I’m so tempted to try fresh crispy jalebi! Deep frying part looks so much fun (and the method looks similar to American funnel cake?)I also noticed we have slightly different but similar sweets in Japan called karinto, deep fried flour dough coated with sweet syrup (with brown sugar though). The texture of jalebi just reminded me of that. Food culture is truly amazing! Thank you so much sharing the recipe 😀

    1. Yeah it is similar to funnel cake in the design part 🙂 I think there’s a deep fried dough in every culture, isn’t it? Just that the flavors are different! I hope you get to try fresh hot jalebis someday, they are the best!

  3. In what type of container should I store so its crispy till the next day and should we store in the contajner right away and close it when it’s hot or let it cool down

  4. Dear Manali,

    This is an excellent recipe. The jalebis have come out exceptionally well. I just had a few questions regarding the sugar syrup. Would really appreciate if you can solve them.
    1) Should the lemon juice be added while the sugar syrup is still getting cooked on the gas?
    2) After 15-20 jalebis the sugar syrup starts to crystallise even after doing the above procedure. Any particular reason.

    1. Hi Sneha, glad you liked the recipe!
      1. yes you may add the lemon juice anytime, it won’t really make a big difference.
      2. hmm I would try and add more lemon juice,maybe 1.5 teaspoon and see!
      Hope that helps 🙂

  5. Thank you for sharing such simple steps. Did you keep the batter in the fridge to ferment or was it left on the kitchen counter?

    1. Hi Neha, it will be left at room temperature. The fermentation occurs due to the presence of natural yeast, if we keep it in the fridge then that won’t happen!

  6. Jalebis look lovely..cant wait to try them..have tried making jalebis in da pst bt nevr gt dem crispy 😪
    I remember the ad by dhara oil..one f my faves during my childhood days😀

  7. After many attempts,I finally made it …Best of my all time …This is perfect and bestest receipe of Jalebi …The consistency and ingredients used in right proportion all is perfect….Thanks for ur receipe ….

  8. Thanks so much for sharing this. My mum used to make these crispy jalebis and she was known for them. She passed away and I never learnt how to make them. I came across your recipe and seems similar to my mum making them. I can’t wait to try them. I do however remember that she used to put the mixture in an ice cream pail and then leave it under the kitchen sink for a couple of days,, is that so?
    Also, she used to save some “boro “ for the next time. Does this sound familiar?
    Then what do u do with this boro?
    Thanks again

      1. Boro is the mixture of maida. After fermentation, my mum used to save some in a yogurt container and keep in the refrigerator, and when she made jalebis again, she took this boro and made another mixture. Not sure why, will find out from my aunts and post again

        1. Boro would be similar to khatai that one keeps from curd to set new curd. The reason seems simple. Instead of using a fermentation agent like soda or baking powder, your Mom would wait for the natural fermentation hence the need to keep for a few days as also the reason why she kept some of the mix aside for the next batch.

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