Motichoor Ladoo

Motichoor Ladoo is a popular Indian sweet, made with besan (gram flour).

It’s one of my favorite sweets which I make for special occasions and is mouthwatering good!

6 motichoor ladoo arranged on a grey plate

I have mentioned this often that as a kid I was a very non-picky eater (and I am still the same!). I used to eat all veggies but the only thing I was picky was sweets.

I only liked 3 Indian sweets as a kid – rasmalai, besan ladoo and motichoor ladoo. These three were my absolute favorite and I didn’t care much for others.

It’s a different story now though. I guess being married to someone who has a massive sweet tooth does change a lot of things!

So, even though I like all sorts of sweets now, the motichoor ladoo remains my absolute favorite!

What is Motichoor Ladoo

Ladoos refers to anything round and sweet and we make a lot of ladoos. I already have several recipes on my blog and there are so many more.

Basically grains, lentils, dried fruits, nuts etc. everything can be converted into a ladoo.

Motichoor ladoo are made with gram flour or besan as we call it.

Tiny drops of chickpea flour (boondi) are deep fried and then mixed with a sugar syrup and then shaped into round balls.

It’s not difficult but like with every Indian sweet, you need some practice and patience to get it right.

How to Make Perfect Motichoor Ladoo

One of the most important things that you would need to make the perfect looking motichoor ladoo at home is a motichoor ladoo jhara.

It’s kind of a ladle (usually made with iron or other metal) with very fine holes. You need the one with tiniest holes for this recipe.

They come in different “hole numbers” like you need number 0 for motichoor ladoo. The bigger the hole number, the bigger are the holes and the bigger your boondi will be.

You can make the recipe using a ladle with bigger holes too but then that would not be motichoor ladoo, it would be boondi ladoo. You need very tiny boondi for this ladoo and for that you need this jhara.

And where do you find this jhara? I got mine from India from a store selling kitchen appliances. I just asked for the one with the smallest hole.

ladoo jhara (ladle) made of brass and iron placed on a board with few ladoos seen on the side

Second, if possible have two people make the ladoo. Let one person pour the batter and the other one tap the jhara with force so that the tiny balls fall rapidly into hot oil.

The person holding the jhara has to start tapping on the ladle as soon as the other person pours the batter.

You can do this alone but having two will make it much easier.

Make a thin flowing batter for these ladoos. It should fall on it’s own as you tap on the jhara.

Do not over-cook the boondis. Since these are very tiny boondi, they need to be fried for like 30 to 40 seconds only. You don’t want them to change color.

Don’t look for any consistency in sugar syrup. Just let the sugar dissolve and mixture come to a boil. Then turn off heat, add the fried boondi and cook on lowest heat until the sugar syrup reduced a bit.

Hold the jhara 3 to 4 inches above oil as you pour the batter. If you hold it very high, the resulting boondi might be flat.

Clean the jhara (ladle) with a wet cloth, wipe it completely clean between frying each batch. If you don’t do that, the boondis might clump together in hot oil.

Fry the boondi in ghee. The ghee in these ladoos is what gives them their amazing taste. So fry in ghee, and if you don’t want to do 100% ghee, you can use half oil and half ghee.

The traditional motichoor ladoo in India are often orange colored and hence I have added some food color here.

If you don’t want to add the color, simply skip.

Flavoring the Ladoo

These ladoos can be flavored with saffron, cardamom, rose water, kewra water etc.

If you ask me, the main flavor comes from the besan and ghee. So frying in ghee is must.

I have added some kewra water and cardamom powder in the sugar syrup. You can add rose water if you don’t have kewra water.

Melon seeds are also often added to these ladoo, however since I didn’t have them I skipped on those.

I hope you guys give these motichoor ladoos a try, they are not difficult trust me. You just need the right ladle to make the tiny boondis and of course some patience! πŸ™‚

Method

1- To a large bowl add besan and food color (I used orange food color).

2- Then add little ghee and mix.

3- Start adding water.

4- Add around 1/2 cup (120 ml) to first form a thick batter without lumps. Then add 3 tablespoons (45 ml) water and mix well. Let the batter sit for 15 minutes.

step by step picture collage of making motichoor ladoo at home

5- Then add remaining 3 tablespoons (45 ml) water and mix. So the total that I used in this batter was 120 ml + 45 ml +45 ml = 210 ml.

6- Batter should be very thin and flowing consistency with no lumps.

7- Heat ghee in a kadai on medium-high heat.

Hold the jhara 3-4 inches above the oil. I use a canister and then place the jhara on top to give it support (see picture).

It also helps to have the support when you shake the jhara vigorously after pouring the batter. The handle of the jhara should be placed on the canister.

8- Fill a ladle with the batter, my ladle was big so I have filled it only half here.

9 & 10- Once ghee is hot, start pouring the batter through the jhara. Ask someone to help you.

11- They should pour the batter on jhara and you should move it up and down quickly (with the handle of the jhara placed on canister) to drop all batter in hot ghee in the kadai. Please see pictures for reference.

12- Let the tiny boondis cook in hot ghee for 30 to 40 seconds only, color should not change.

step by step picture collage of making motichoor ladoo at home

13- Remove fried boondi in a large sieve. Repeat until all tiny boondis are fried and batter is over. Remember to completely wipe clean the jhara with a wet cloth between frying each batch else the boondis can clump up. Set aside.

14- To make the syrup, to a large kadai, add sugar and water. Add cardamom powder, kewra water (or rose water).

15- Also add lemon juice and food color, if using.

16- Let the sugar dissolve and mixture come to a boil.

step by step picture collage of making motichoor ladoo at home

17- As soon as the mixture comes to a boil, turn off the heat and add the fried boondi to the pan. Stir and then turn on the heat again with heat set to lowest setting.

18- Cook on lowest heat for around 3 minutes, stirring continuously. You don’t want to dry the boondi but the excess sugar syrup should become less. It takes around 2 to 3 minutes.

Don’t overcook it else the boondi will dry out and won’t be soft from inside.

19- Remove on a plate and let cool completely. You can add melon seeds now. I didn’t have any.

20- Once the mixture has cooled down, take a small portion of the boondi mixture and roll between your palms to make motichoor ladoo. Repeat with the remaining boondi.

step by step picture collage of making motichoor ladoo at home

You would get around 12 to 15 ladoos from this.

Enjoy these Motichoor Ladoo as a special treat!

motichoor ladoo placed on an extended palm with more ladoos placed in a plate in the background

If you’ve tried this Motichoor Ladoo Recipe then don’t forget to rate the recipe! You can also follow me on Facebook,Β InstagramΒ to see what’s latest in my kitchen!

This post has been updated from the recipe archives, first published in October 2015.

Motichoor Ladoo

6 motichoor ladoo arranged on a grey plate
Manali
Motichoor Ladoo has tiny boondi made from besan (gram flour) that are fried in ghee and then mixed with a sugar syrup. This popular Indian sweet is a dessert for special occasions!
5 from 2 votes
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 30 mins
Resting Time 15 mins
Total Time 55 mins
Course Dessert
Cuisine Indian
Servings 12 ladoos
Calories 127 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 1 cup besan 110 grams, gram flour
  • orange food color
  • 1/2 teaspoon ghee melted
  • 1/2 cup + 6 tablespoons water divided, 120 ml + 90 ml
  • ghee or oil, for frying, around 2 cups
  • melon seeds optional, to add to the ladoo while binding

Sugar Syrup

  • 1 cup granulated white sugar 200 grams
  • 1/2 cup water 120 ml
  • 1.5 teaspoons kewra water or rose water
  • 1/4 teaspoon cardamom powder
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • orange food color

Instructions
 

  • Please note that before you start it's important to have the right equipment to make the perfect motichoor ladoo. A motichoor ladoo jhara with the smallest opening (number 0 or 1) is what you need. If you use a ladle with bigger holes or any other ladle, then the boondis will be large in size and it won't be motichoor ladoo. It would simply be boondi ladoo. You need very tiny boondis for this ladoo and for that you need that jhara.

Fry the boondi

  • Β To a large bowl add besan and food color (I used orange food color). Then add little ghee and mix.
  • Start adding water. Add around 1/2 cup (120 ml) to first form a thick batter without lumps. Then add 3 tablespoons (45 ml) water and mix well. Let the batter sit for 15 minutes.
  • Then add remaining 3 tablespoons (45 ml) water and mix. So the total that I used in this batter was 120 ml + 45 ml +45 ml = 210 ml.
    Batter should be very thin and flowing consistency without any lumps.
  • Heat ghee in a kadai on medium-high heat.
  • Hold the jhara 3-4 inches above the oil. I use a canister and then place the jhara on top to give it support (see pictures above).
    It also helps to have the support when you shake the jhara vigorously after pouring the batter. The handle of the jhara should be placed on the canister.
  • Fill a ladle with the batter, my ladle was big so I have filled it only half here.
  • Once ghee is hot, start pouring the batter through the jhara. Ask someone to help you.
  • They should pour the batter on jhara and you should move it up and down quickly (with the handle of the jhara placed on canister) to drop all batter in hot ghee in the kadai. Please see pictures above for reference.
  • Let the tiny boondis cook in hot ghee for 30 to 40 seconds only, color should not change.
  • Remove fried boondi in a large sieve. Repeat until all tiny boondis are fried and batter is over. Remember to completely wipe clean the jhara with a wet cloth between frying each batch else the boondis can clump up. Set aside.

Make the sugar syrup

  • To make the syrup, to a large kadai, add sugar and water. Add cardamom powder, kewra water (or rose water).
    Also add lemon juice and food color, if using.
  • Let the sugar dissolve and mixture come to a boil.
  • As soon as the mixture comes to a boil, turn off the heat and add the fried boondi to the pan. Stir and then turn on the heat again with heat set to lowest setting.
  • Cook on lowest heat for around 3 minutes, stirring continuously. You don't want to dry the boondi but the excess sugar syrup should become less. It takes around 2 to 3 minutes.
    Don't overcook it else the boondi will dry out and won't be soft from inside.

Shape the ladoo

  • Remove on a plate and let cool completely. You can add melon seeds now. I didn't have any.
  • Once the mixture has cooled down, take a small portion of the boondi mixture and roll between your palms to make motichoor ladoo. Repeat with the remaining boondi.
  • You would get around 12 to 15 ladoos from this.
    Enjoy these Motichoor Ladoo as a special treat!

Notes

  1. Please note that before you start it's important to have the right equipment to make the perfect motichoor ladoo. A motichoor ladoo jhara with the smallest opening (number 0 or 1) is what you need. If you use a ladle with bigger holes or any other ladle, then the boondis will be large in size and it won't be motichoor ladoo. It would simply be boondi ladoo. You need very tiny boondis for this ladoo and for that you need that jhara.
  2. Using food color is optional. Yellow or orange food color are traditionally used in these ladoos however you may skip it.Β 

Nutrition

Calories: 127kcalCarbohydrates: 23gProtein: 2gFat: 3gSaturated Fat: 2gCholesterol: 7mgSodium: 8mgPotassium: 85mgFiber: 1gSugar: 18gVitamin C: 1mgCalcium: 5mgIron: 1mg
Keyword motichoor ladoo
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60 thoughts on “Motichoor Ladoo

  1. Aw I am sorry you are feeling homesick Manali! I am sure it is hard to be away from your family!! Hugs to you friend!
    But what a fun way to celebrate! I love unique desserts! These look amazing!

  2. OMG, sorry that you are homesick Manali! I have a lot of family in Europe and I can relate to this… But you are going there at the and of the year, right? So am I πŸ™‚ Love this Indian dessert! Perfect!

  3. I know how hard it is to be away from your loved ones, but hopefully time goes by quickly and you’ll be back with your family soon πŸ™‚ I’ve never had a ladoo before but it looks and sounds sensational!

  4. What a fun festival! I know it must be hard to be away from your family and culture during this time, but hopefully it brings back happy memories from your childhood! This dessert sounds amazingly delicious! I need to meet some Indian friends who live close by to celebrate Diwali with and try all the yummy foods!

  5. It breaks my heart that you can’t be home for Diwali. Perhaps one of these years you will make it back so that you can enjoy the festivities and all those yummy sweets in the country that you love. Speaking of yummy sweets. . .this Ladoo is quite possibly one of the beautiful sweets I have ever seen. While beautiful on its own, that edible silver lead really adds something special.

  6. Diwali sounds so amazing Manali! I’m sorry that you can’t be home for the holidays. These sweets are beautiful, and have such an amazing combination of flavours! I can’t wait to try them! Love the addition of edible silver leaf!

  7. Haha my favs were and still the same.. besan ladoo motichoor ladoo rasgulla more than rasmalai and jilebi!!!! Thks to u i am gonna try mak them all! Love u for this! And love gagan for introducing me to u!

  8. Manali,

    I don’t miss eating out ever since I discovered your website!

    I wanted to particularly point out the way you explain and guide your readers through the recipes. Big thanks for sharing the tips and tricks that you learnt after all your hard work at getting the dishes perfected. You then makes it easy for folks like us to follow.

    I tried Paneer butter masala, Achari aloo recipe over this week by looking at your instructions and it came out very well! There were no left overs πŸ™‚ Since you have both numbered pictures on and the texts to go along with it, it became very easy to gather ingredients and start cooking while referring to the recipe.

    My wife loves sweet, so I am planning to make this Motichoor Laddu for her birthday.
    By the way, the tips on the height to hold the jhara goes on to tell how much you care about helping us getting this right. Kudos for specifically writing down these important nuances.

    I’ve bookmarked this page for life!

    Stay healthy and happy!

  9. 5 stars
    I have tried many times to make motichoor ladoo but unfortunately never managed. Today I followed your recipe and believe me it turned out brilliant.. everyone at home just loved them….step by step instructions are just so good and result is satisfying…thank you so much Manali jee

    1. Hi, as I have mentioned in this post if you use a frying ladle the boondi will be quite big and it won’t be motichoor ladoo then, just boondi ladoo. So if you want to make that, sure go ahead. Also, I have tried once with sieve, it doesn’t work for me.

      1. Hi Minali, I made the besan from your recipe which turned out lot better than my other recipes. I need more practice. Now I would like to make normal boondi laddoos. Do I need to change anything other than the big hole jharni? Also I like to put specks of green and dark orange color in mine. Do I prepare separate chasni with different colours (very small amount) and then mix it with the main boondi? Thank you!

  10. 5 stars
    Hello Manali,

    Your Motichoor laddoos look mouth watering. Thanks for the recipe with exact proportions.
    Lot of recipes show that their jhara has funnel kind of hole, however the jhara I got has just holes and no funnel at the back.Your jhara in the picture looks like mine. Can you please let me know if your jhara has funnel type structure at the back or not. Also, did you use laddoo besan ( coarse ) variety or the regular fine besan in the recipe. Thank you so much for your help and posting such amazing recipes.

    Regards,
    Shilpi

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